Kindle 2.0

You know I’m a big fan of the Amazon Kindle. I bought my Kindle nearly a year ago in preparation for a trip to Europe. It worked like a dream. And in those days, it was a dream. Now Amazon has released a new version, the Kindle 2.

Amazon owns the turf when it comes to portable reading devices. Downloads are easy. Storage space is incredible. The interface and hardware are simple to use. And Amazon is publishing Kindle versions of everything under the sun . . . for a much lower price than hard copy. They’ve even got my book Faith, Film, and Philosophy in a Kindle version.

With the hoopla over the Kindle 2, I’ve been getting questions about my experience and whether I still recommend the device. Yes. Unequivocally, yes. My Kindle goes where I go—or, rather, I go wherever my Kindle goes. I wouldn’t be without it. So, will I now be buying the Kindle 2?

I would be if I didn’t already have a Kindle. K2 has longer battery life, a more streamlined profile, and some additional storage space. I guess it works a little faster, too. There weren’t a lot of pre-Kindle 2 kinks to work out, so the Kindle 2 isn’t a major upgrade for previous users. The “read-to-me” feature is new, but I wouldn’t pay extra for it. Turns out, though, you don’t have to. Some may have hoped that Kindle 2 would cost less than Kindle 1. Who wouldn’t? But it could hardly be expected. Amazon has sold tons of these devices. The best evidence for that is the increase in Kindle versions of books in their massive catalog. And when you calculate how much books cost, the savings of Kindle versions, and the exotic utility of the Kindle 2, the price should be easy enough to swallow.

At the same price as the original device, Kindle 2 is still a bargain. I mean that. I carry around dozens of books, many of them reference works, and have my portable library on hand for every occasion.

My students know about my Kindle zeal, so they might be thinking they could buy a Kindle and use it in class. They’d probably be right. First, they could be reading anything, including my own publications, and I would never know it. Second, in one year, Amazon has made an amazing number of philosophy texts available in Kindle versions. And if Amazon is publishing that much stuff in technical philosophy, you can be sure they’ve got what most of the real people in the world want in a good read!

If you don’t know much about the Kindle, then start here for more information.

Later I’ll be posting more suggestions about the Kindle. Meanwhile, you may want to search my blog for other articles with tips about using the Kindle.

If you’re a Kindle user, let me know in the comments box for this post. What do you like most about having a Kindle? If you don’t have a Kindle, try to explain that to me in the comments box!

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About Doug Geivett
University Professor; PhD in philosophy; author; conference speaker. Hobbies include motorcycling, travel, kayaking, sailing.

3 Responses to Kindle 2.0

  1. Doug Geivett says:

    Right, David. The allure of Kindle 2 should be especially strong to newcomers to the Kindle, since most “Kindle 1” users will be perfectly content to keep their original Kindles, at least for the time being. In other words, user satisfaction with the first Kindle is a spur to non-users to give it a go with the new Kindle 2. I’ve noticed that Hugh Hewitt, radio host quartered here in southern California, has only recently been talking up the virtues of Kindle. He’s a year behind the news on this one, but he’s absolutely right to trumpet this startling and practically useful technological development.

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  2. Doug Geivett says:

    Right, David. The allure of Kindle 2 should be especially strong to newcomers to the Kindle, since most “Kindle 1” users will be perfectly content to keep their original Kindles, at least for the time being. In other words, user satisfaction with the first Kindle is a spur to non-users to give it a go with the new Kindle 2. I’ve noticed that Hugh Hewitt, radio host quartered here in southern California, has only recently been talking up the virtues of Kindle. He’s a year behind the news on this one, but he’s absolutely right to trumpet this startling and practically useful technological development.

    Like

  3. David Parker says:

    Even though Kindle 2 is quite alluring with new sleek design and faster page turns, I have remained faithful to my original Kindle. Like you said, it really isn’t that much of an upgrade unless you are dying to have a slightly thinner unit. The extra battery charge doesn’t seem like much of an upgrade, because the original Kindle can go for weeks without recharging.

    In the past 6 months or so that I’ve owned the Kindle, I’ve downloaded about 30 books. The tweny-five minute train commute to work gives me almost an hour a day of quiet reading time (I get on very early!). It is very convenient that I needn’t worry about which book to bring. I can change my mind at any time!

    As an interesting side note: you can sort the Kindle book list by price and find about 500 free books. Some gems are to be found there, including a collections of speeches and essays by Thomas Jefferson and John Adams.

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