More Christmas Reading


In my recent post “‘Tis the Season for Christmas Reading,” I included titles to consider in the days leading up to Christmas. But there are many more to know about.

One I should have included comes from the category of fantasy, by one of fantasy fictions greatest practitioners, J. R. R. Tolkien. For twenty years Tolkien wrote and illustrated letters from Father Christmas, delivered from the North Pole to his own children. So here is my entry for best fantasy fiction for this year: Letters from Father Christmas, by J. R. R. Tolkien (in hardback or paperback). You may be inspired to write your own letters from Santa or Father Christmas to children (your own, or someone else’s).

The rest of this post will be updated as I’m able, with More Christmas Reading:

Fantasy Fiction

General Fiction

Humorous Fiction

Hymns and Carols

Miscellany

Mystery & Suspense

Non-fiction—Social Commentary

Poetry

Thematic

Note: Though I’ve been careful in selecting these titles, I haven’t read all of them myself.

Original Post: ‘Tis the Season for Christmas Reading

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Christmas Quote—Do You Know What You Want for Christmas?


“There are things you don’t ask for because you know you can’t have them, and then there are things so far outside the realm of possibility, it would never even occur to you to want them.”

—Fred to Lauren, in the short story “Miracle,” by Connie Willis

‘Tis the Season for Christmas Reading


There’s so much great Christmas-related fiction that you have to start January 1 to get it all in before Christmas. But the best time to dive into Christmas stories, large and small, is during the Christmas “season.” That starts earlier for some people than others. But within ten days of December 25 you should be into the spirit of things. Some good reading can help.

Here are a few tips, including some suggested reading: Read more of this post

Thought for the Day—December 17, 2009


If you yank the heart out of truth, you have nothing left but a bloodless form of belief. —RDG

Don’t Fool Yourself


If you think you don’t need to read this book, you’re probably fooling yourself. I Told Me So: Self-Deception and the Christian Life—by my friend and colleague, Gregg Ten Elshof—may get you thinking about all those people you know who deceive themselves. It should be obvious that that’s not the goal of the book. But because what Gregg says in his book is so on target, I’m afraid it won’t be obvious to everyone.

Forward by Dallas Willard. For more details on this new title, click here for the Amazon description.

Thought for the Day—December 13, 2009


I don’t know when. I don’t know how. But I do know why. —RDG

Edgar Allan Poe and “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar”


Occasionally I dip into my copy of Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination, a compact and inexpensive, but moderately elegant, hard copy edition in the Barnes and Noble “Collector’s Library.” It measures 4 inches by 6 inches, is not quite an inch thick, has gilt edges, and a wine-colored ribbon.

The collection includes Poe’s story “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar,” a story ostensibly about the effects of mesmerism (the precursor to hypnotism) on an individual who is about to die.

Though not obvious to everyone when first published 20 December 1845, the story is pure fabrication. Read more of this post

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